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Moskaluk said the search is ongoing. A forensics team specializing in recovering evidence was brought in to help last week and Moskaluk said the RCMP’s underwater recovery team has been conducting searches of the Salmon River, which runs through the 10-hectare property. A title search shows the property is owned by Wayne and Evelyn Sagmoen. It is not know whether they are related to Curtis Wayne Sagmoen, who was charged Oct. 17 with disguising his face with intent to commit an offence, uttering threats and weapons offences. The charges came after police issued a warning to “the general public and women sex workers” about a possible risk around Salmon River Road after a incident on Aug. 28 when a woman was allegedly threatened with a firearm. Sagmoen’s lawyer, Lisa Jean Helps, declined comment after her client appeared in court last week in Vernon. “We are expecting that this may take some time to work its way through the justice system and we look forward to this all being litigated in front of a court of competent jurisdiction,” she said. Sagmoen is scheduled to appear in court in Vernon on Nov. 23. Five women have gone missing in the same area of the north Okanagan in the past 20 months. Police have not linked the property search with any ongoing investigation or with the public warning. Genereaux said his daughter had been splitting her time between his house and her mother’s home, which are five to 10 minutes apart on foot. He last saw her on the afternoon of May 29 when she stepped out to get a telescope from her mom’s place. “We were going to sit outside and watch the stars that night,” he said. When she didn’t return, he thought she had decided to stay with her mom. He began to worry a couple days later when he phoned her mother and learned she wasn’t there. A friend of his daughter’s then phoned him to say he had seen her speaking to a man in a white van outside Vernon’s bottle depot on May 29. Genereaux said his daughter had made some poor decisions in the past but she was getting her life on track. She had...

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OTTAWA — The Conservatives continued to raise more money than any other federal party during the third quarter of the year but the ruling Liberals closed the gap somewhat. According to financial returns filed with Elections Canada, the Conservatives raked in $3.6 million from July to the end of September, from more than 32,000 donors. The Liberals were close behind with $3.1 million from almost 30,000 donors. The New Democrats continued to lag well behind, raising just over $1 million from close to 20,000 donors. However, another $835,000 was pulled in by NDP leadership contenders. The Conservatives raised almost twice as much as the Liberals in the first quarter of 2017, when the ruling party froze fundraising events featuring the prime minister and cabinet ministers as it developed new rules for such events. That gap narrowed in the second quarter — with the Tories taking in $4.1 million to the Liberals’ $3 million — and again in the third quarter. Liberal party spokesman Braeden Caley argued the Liberals are the only major party to see an increase in fundraising from one quarter to the next throughout 2017, while the Conservative haul has “dropped significantly” in each quarter. However, the Conservatives boasted that they just posted their best third quarter results since losing the election in 2015. By The Canadian Press Source...

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Morneau owns some $21 million worth of shares in Morneau Shepell. Those shares are held by a numbered Calgary-based holding company, which is majority owned by an Ontario numbered company of which Morneau is the sole owner. He jointly owns four other numbered real estate holding companies with his siblings, all of which are involved in condominiums in Florida. Because the Morneau Shepell shares are not held directly by Morneau, federal ethics commissioner Mary Dawson advised him in 2015 that he did not need to divest them or put them in a blind trust. Rather, she recommended that he set up a conflict of interest screen to ensure he was not involved in any discussion or decision that could benefit Morneau Shepell. Morneau followed Dawson’s advice but opposition parties have accused him of conflict of interest since he, as finance minister, regulates the pension industry. They have zeroed in specifically on a bill Morneau introduced a year ago that would allow pension administrators to convert direct benefit pension plans into targeted benefit pension plans — a change for which Morneau Shepell had lobbied. The bill has languished on the order paper since its introduction. Nevertheless, in response to an NDP complaint, Dawson last week said she has some concerns about Morneau’s involvement with the bill and intends to look into the matter. In the Commons on Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau continued to reiterate that Morneau followed Dawson’s advice to the letter in dealing with his assets. And he said ministers in the former Conservative government arranged their personal finances in a similar way to avoid conflicts of interests. Trudeau attempted to draw Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer’s finances into the debate, saying he’s “absolutely certain” that Scheer “also followed the advice of the conflict of interest and ethics commissioners in accordance to his own personal tax dispositions.” That appeared to be an oblique allusion to the fact that Scheer has an ownership stake in three real estate limited partnerships (RELPs), which can be used as tax shelters. One Liberal MP, Raj Grewal, told the CBC that it’s “the height of hypocrisy” for Conservatives to hammer Morneau when Scheer himself “holds investments that are designed to take advantage of the...

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OTTAWA — A top Chinese Communist Party official says a Canadian imprisoned in China for more than a decade had his life sentence reduced because he took part in a re-education program. Huseyin Celil, of southern Ontario, received a life sentence in 2007 for terrorism-related charges after a widely criticized trial that has strained Sino-Canadian relations over the course of two Conservative and Liberal governments. Celil, an advocate for China’s persecuted Uighur community, fled to Canada in 2000 and later became a citizen. He was arrested in Uzbekistan in 2006 on a trip to visit his wife’s relatives, and sent to China where he was convicted and sentenced to life a year later. Last year, the sentences given to Celil and 10 other Uighurs were reduced but the Chinese government didn’t specify by how much. Zuo Feng, a visiting Communist Party official, says Celil’s life sentence has been reduced to 18 years. By The Canadian Press Source...

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Last October, a five-year deadline passed for provinces to file detailed plans on how they were going to restore critical habitat. Several provinces, including Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, have released draft plans. Others have said some of their plans are expected early next year. None has completely met the terms of the federal bill. Under the Species At Risk Act, Ottawa will now take until April 2018 to determine whether the provinces have sufficiently protected critical habitat. If they haven’t, the environment minister is required to ask for a federal order to do it for them. Wilkinson said the federal government and the provinces agree all 51 herds can still be preserved, although that could change. “We’re certainly open to engaging the provinces as we move forward,” he said. “There would have to be a scientific underpinning to the argument.” Justina Ray, head scientist for the Wildlife Conservation Society, said some herds could disappear in as little as five years if nothing changes. She said the federal report puts the provinces on notice. “This is the first shot across the bow,” she said. “It is making a statement that there is more work that needs to be done.” But Nighbor said not enough is known about the impacts of climate change, predators or invasive diseases to pin all the blame on habitat disturbance. He points out that some herds considered stable live on ranges that are 95 per cent disturbed, although those herds are also protected by massive wolf culls. “You need to look at all the factors,” he said, adding Ottawa also needs to ensure that local communities are involved in decisions. Wilkinson said governments are willing to take a look at any new science, but something must be done. “The scientific evidence is very clear, that habitat destruction is directly related to the decline in caribou,” he said. “We need to take action.” — Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960 By Bob Weber, The Canadian Press Source...

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PENNDEL, Pa. — A war kept Wayne Wood’s brother from attending his first wedding, and a hurricane briefly derailed the secret plans for his second, but the 84-year-old has finally said “I do” again — this time with his unsuspecting brother serving as best man. Wood and his new wife, Joyce Wood, live in Lake Placid, Florida, but devised a ruse to marry in Pennsylvania while visiting Wood’s brother, Gordon Wood. The Bucks County Courier Times reports the ceremony was scheduled for September but was put on hold after Hurricane Irma. The couple arrived last week. On Monday, Joyce Wood said she needed to pick something up at a Bucks County courthouse. Instead, she and Wayne Wood were married on the spot. Gordon Wood says he’d never seen his brother happier. He was serving in the Korean War during his brother’s first wedding. ___ Information from: Bucks County Courier Times, http://www.buckscountycouriertimes.com By The Associated Press Source...

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Centennial College students are increasingly worried as the faculty strike on Ontario campuses continues, the college’s student president said a day before a planned rally at Queen’s Park. “They’re just feeling helpless because they don’t know if their semester will be lost or not,” Ravneet Kaur, of the Centennial College Student Association Inc. (CCSAI), said Tuesday. A 2006 faculty strike at Ontario colleges lasted three and a half weeks. Kaur said students could start losing their semesters if the current one goes beyond four. International students worry about their visas and fees, but all students are affected, some saying they don’t have strong financial resources and “would just be done” with college if they had to repeat a year, Kaur said. CCSAI stays neutral on the strike, she said, but the association wants “student voices heard,” and for both sides to return to bargaining. Along with other student governments in Toronto, CCSAI planned to bus students to a rally, scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 1, in front of the Ontario Legislature. The College Student Alliance, organizing the event, hasn’t chosen sides in the dispute, but on its Facebook page says, “a unified voice showing our strength will pressure both sides to make a deal immediately.” Source...

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IQALUIT, Nunavut — Voters in Canada’s eastern Arctic headed to the polls Monday in Nunavut’s fifth general election since becoming a territory. There are no political parties in Nunavut’s consensus-style government, so those elected will meet a few days after the vote and choose a premier and cabinet from among themselves. No matter who wins, the eastern Arctic will have a new premier as incumbent Peter Taptuna did not run for re-election. Incumbents were re-elected in several ridings, including Aggu, Arviat South, Baker Lake, Gjoa Haven, Hudson Bay, Iqaluit-Niaqunnguu, Iqaluit-Tasiluk, Netsilik, Rankin Inlet South, Tununiq and Uqqummiut. But there were also a number of upsets including Amittuq, which went to Joelie Kaernerk; Iqaluit-Sinaa, where Elisapee Sheutiapik won; Pangnirtung, where Margaret Nakashuk was elected; Quttiktuq, which went to David Akeegok; and Rankin Inlet South, which was taken by Lorne Kusugak. Three cabinet ministers from Taptuna’s government went to defeat — Rankin Inlet North-Chesterfield Inlet, where Cathy Towtongie beat out cabinet minister Johnny Mike; Arviat Whate Cove, where John Main defeated incumbent George Kuksuk; and Iqaluit-Manirajak, where Monica Ell-Kanayuk was ousted by Adam Arreak Lightstone. Chief Electoral Officer Dustin Fredlund said all 72 polling stations were up and operating election day, with no weather-related closures. Voter turnout was high, reaching 81 per cent in Arviat South and almost 77 per cent in Pangnirtung. Many ridings had turnouts of more than 60 per cent and only a couple came in at less than 50 per cent. By many measures, Taptuna hands off a territory in improved shape. The books remain balanced. Three mines are now producing and several others are moving forward. The Conference Board of Canada predicted 4.9 per cent growth for Nunavut this year, outpacing the Canadian average. Source...

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OTTAWA — Statistics Canada says real gross domestic product pulled back by 0.1 per cent in August, hit by declines in manufacturing and mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction. The agency says goods-producing industries contracted by 0.7 per cent for the month, while services-producing industries edged up 0.1 per cent. Twelve of 20 sectors improved for the month, but weakness in manufacturing and mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction more than offset the gains. The manufacturing sector contracted 1.0 per cent for the month as both durable and non-durable manufacturing declined. Non-durable manufacturing fell 2.0 per cent, while durable manufacturing slipped 0.1 per cent. The mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction sector fell 0.8 per cent in August. By The Canadian Press Source...

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OTTAWA — Of all the headaches Bill Morneau is nursing these days, this might be the least of them: what’s the best way to donate millions of dollars in stock-market gains to charity? Nice problem to have, many Canadians might say. But even finance ministers have to manage their money, and Morneau is doubtless well aware of the whopping tax bill that will accompany the sale of roughly $21-million worth of shares in his former company, Morneau Shepell. A cynic might suggest that’s part of the reason he has decided to make a charitable donation out of the difference between what the shares are worth today and what they were worth in 2015 when he first became finance minister — a dollar figure roughly estimated at around $5 million. Donating that much to charity will bring a sizeable tax credit that should help to soften the blow. But experts have advice for anyone contemplating such a decision: donate the shares themselves instead of selling them. It’s in Morneau’s interest to donate the value in shares, since liquidating the stock first would result in a big tax hit, particularly when it comes to capital gains, said accountant Robert Kleinman, executive vice-president of The Jewish Community Foundation of Montreal. “It would be foolish to sell those shares, get the cash, and then donate the cash,” Kleinman said. “Look, he’s going to be poorer by doing this. By donating, his total value — even with the tax savings — will be less because he’s giving $5 million. But the cost of the gift will be relatively low.” Morneau’s latest move is one of several he’s made in recent days to counter opposition allegations that he profited from decisions he’s taken since becoming federal finance minister two years ago. The transaction is expected to be conducted by a trustee under the guidance of the federal ethics commissioner. The conflict-of-interest allegations stem from a pension bill, introduced in the House of Commons by Morneau himself, that could benefit Morneau Shepell, a human resources and pension management firm he helped build with his father. Source...

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